25/09/2012

GIS information is a double edge sword


GIS Information is a double edge sword

People want GIS data as accurate as possible but when the information drawn from that is against what they hope to find, they will fault the agency that collected that data and term it inaccurate. We were babbling away on this subject when it was pointed out when information output-ed from some GIS data showed that there were some inadequacy in a certain area, it could help justify an agency to pump money there to alleviate that problem. However in a certain case, the politician for that region  went on and  formally quoted that no such issue arose within his constituency giving the impression that he has always been a Little Jack Horner. As I deal with GIS data, I am torn between producing accurate data which may backfire. To be or not to be, that is the question. Which is the price of truth? I grew up believing a simple philosophy taught by my mother who said "If you like say so, if you don't, say so" but now I've learnt that honesty may not be the best policy. Yes, as I grew older, I became wiser and learnt that people only want to hear what they want to hear because often the truth hurts. Unfortunately, GIS information acquired from GIS data is a double edge sword and can be hit back and the more accurate the GIS data, in the 'wrong' hands, the more deeper the cut can be. So what now: Collect data as accurately as possible or not?

4 comments:

  1. I think it's dereliction of duty to do otherwise.

    Now, interpreting data is another matter. One can always get "experts" to prove (or disprove) your case - but in the end, making data available, documenting parameters and methodologies, make it easier for more people to validate or reject any claims made by any party.

    Good data is agnostic. In the same way that guns don't kill.

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    1. I like your last 3 words, well put.

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  2. Abbas if you want to watch the mirror and respect the guy who is there then honesty always is the best politic.

    Dava Sobel's Longitude tell us about king Louis XIV who said he had lost more terrain in hands of his astronomers than with his enemies. That was because of increasing precision of their maps. So... good luck "astronomer"

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    1. I have always live by the rule that honesty is the best policy but it has always got me into trouble but I do what I believe in...that's life , we all have a choice and that's the path I choose though often it has brought me sorrow.

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